Side Quest: Senjougaraha Moor

Nikko has more than just shrines and temples, and we made it a point on our trip to take in some of the area’s beautiful scenery. Senjougahara Moor is a high altitude marshland situated north of Lake Chuzenji. Senjougahara means field of battle, alluding to stories of gods that once fought there. Nowadays it’s a more laid-back affair, providing visitors leisurely hiking trails through the marsh.

We arrive at the park after a jaunt along mountain roads. At the main parking area for the hiking trails we decide on which route to take.

There are several entry points into the marsh depending on how long a hike you want and where you want to end up.

Our route starts with a bit of walking alongside the road.

We make it to the trailhead. Even though we waited until the afternoon to let the paths dry out, it was still kinda of muddy.

The trail follows a small stream to the marsh.

The stream quickly turns into a river as we transfer from muddy trails to boardwalks above the marsh.

Pops of color break up the greenery.

Bunches of golden leaves cling to the branches.

Even the marsh is turning shades of yellow and light brown.

It seems like a lot of the colorful leaves like to hide behind dead branches and fallen trees.

Some closeup shots of the marsh and trees at an outlook point on the path.

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And some of the overall landscape of the marshlands.

Diving back into the forested area, we spot a mushroom shelf.

Walking along the river is quite peaceful.

The trail starts to break away from the trees and cuts across the marsh.

The landscape is quite different from other areas in Japan.

The path turns back into the forested area.

It splits into two.

And eventually comes back together.

We dive deeper into the forest.

In the underbrush, we spot a deer out on a stroll.

Making our way along the trail as it breaks out into the marshland for the final time.

I thoroughly enjoyed hiking Senjougahara Moor and taking in the surroundings. Springtime is also supposed to be a great time to see the marshland. But I think a sunny autumn day would be the perfect time to visit again.